Worship Resources For Everyone

 

Are you ready for full and active participation in the Liturgy? Read on…

 

Note: The musicians will not announce the music before beginning during the Season of Lent. This is an attempt to preserve the quiet, reflective nature of the season. Everything you need to participate will be in the printed Lenten worship aid. Be sure to have both the worship aid and a Gather hymnal with you. You might consider not clapping at the end of the Liturgy.

 

April 18th, Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper

A link to the readings from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops:
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/041819-evening.cfm

April 19th, Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion

A link to the readings from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops:
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/041919.cfm

April 20th, Easter Sunday: The Resurrection of the Lord (At the Easter Vigil in the Holy Night of Easter)

A link to the readings from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops:
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/042019.cfm

April 21st, Easter Sunday: The Resurrection of the Lord (The Mass of Easter Day)

A link to the readings from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops:
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/042119.cfm

A Reflection on the Readings

Holy Week is one continuous liturgy when we celebrate the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It comes from Latin roots that mean, essentially, “the three days” or “period of three days” (tri- = three, -dies = days). The three days are filled with traditions, deep meaning and completely different celebrations. We should remember that while we are celebrating in Roseville, out sisters and brothers are gathering to celebrate all across the world.

The Triduum begins with Holy Thursday when we celebrate the Feast of the Lord’s supper. We are also challenged to follow Jesus’ example and wash the feet of those around us. This can be a challenge for some, but also a beautiful symbol of humble service to one another. Our Lord wants to, and can, wash us clean the things that embarrass us or bind us in shame. Our Lord knows who we really are, not our imaginary self-portrait, our face to the world, but who we are at ground level where our feet can be somewhat dirty and embarrassing. He wants to wash us clean, soothe and refresh us, so that we can better follow him on the Way. Holy Thursday calls each of us to see the connection between service and hospitality. If the Eucharist has any impact on our lives then at least it should leave us conscious of the injustices in the world and should give us a desire to want to get down and get dirty in fixing up the problems. We leave Holy Thursday in silence ready to return the next day to continue the liturgy.

Every year the Passion reading on Good Friday is from the Gospel of John. As Jesus dies upon the cross, his last breath becomes the free legacy of the life-giving Spirit, the accomplishment of the gift of life he had come to impart to all those who believed in him. In his mother and the “disciple whom he loved” (a stand-in for all subsequent believers, including us), a new community is born, those empowered to become “children of God” and to live out “the truth”. No matter what we’ve done or what we’re doing, nothing can separate us from the love of God poured out in Jesus Christ the Lord. No matter what particular crosses we carry with us into the Church, we believe that God’s commitment to us was such that he even went to suffering and death to reveal his saving love. A significant element of the Good Friday service is the veneration of the Cross when all are invited to process forward and touch or kiss the Cross that is the central symbol of Good Friday. Veneration of holy objects and places is an ancient practice that draws people into connection with the mystery and history of the thing they venerate.

Next, we gather for the Easter Vigil, this is the longest of the evenings. Just as a family will gather round on important occasions and tell and retell the family stories, so there is a sense in which the Church keeps its “best stories” for this most significant celebration. These are the family stories that shape our identity as Christians: they tell us where we have come from, who we are and where we are going according to the saving plan of God. We bless the water and renew our Baptismal promises. We welcome two adults this year to the fullness of family through the preparation of RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults). Then, in the Gospel we celebrate the Resurrection with the women who came to the tomb to complete the burial rites. They did not expect to find it empty. When they report what they have seen and heard, the Eleven and those with them do not believe them. Despite Jesus’ own earlier predictions, they are not prepared to believe in his resurrection, and they certainly are not going to accept the fact of it on the word of women. It was to women that the proclamation of Jesus’ resurrection was first announced. They are the first to share the Good News. There is a lot to celebrate this evening as well as a reception to follow.

Finally, for Easter Sunday we will gather to fully celebrate this amazing week and all that our loving God has done for us. Each evening has its own traditions and rich customs. Each evening is a part of the overall liturgy. Reach out to invite a friend, neighbor or someone who used be in the community. If you have never been, make the time to come and celebrate, for your Easter joy will be that much greater and our community will be complete.

 


Music as Prayer (Bis orat qui bene cantat)

A greater entrance into the prayer of the Liturgy is achieved by being familiar with the music. In particular, the Psalm functions best as a meditation on the readings when we know it well and the mechanics of singing it do not consume too much of our focus. Similarly, with the individual parts of the Mass Settings (the sung acclamations)

Psalm – YouTube link:

Mass Setting – YouTube links:
Mass Of Mercy – Lori True and Paul Tate
Holy, Holy, Holy
Memorial Acclamation (different words but melody is essentially the same)
Amen
Lamb Of God

Preface Dialog – YouTube link:
Traditional Chant – ICEL

Our Father – Fr. Paveglio & Corpus Christi:
Traditional Chant – ICEL

Mass PartNumber (if present) and Title in the Gather hymnal
Gathering Song:
Penitential Rite:
Psalm:
Gospel Acclamation:
Prayers of the Faithful:
Preparation of Gifts:
Eucharistic Acclamations:
Lamb of God:
Communion:
Closing:

The Worship Calendar:

 

Nearby: St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church  (clustered with Corpus Christi)